Feasibility of industrial hemp production in the United States Pacific Northwest

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by
Agricultural Experiment Station, Oregon State University , [Corvallis, Or.]
Hemp industry -- Northwest, Pac
StatementDaryl T. Ehrensing.
SeriesStation bulletin -- 681., Station bulletin (Oregon State University. Agricultural Experiment Station) -- 681.
ContributionsOregon State University. Agricultural Experiment Station.
The Physical Object
Pagination41 p. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16098268M

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Industrial hemp in the United States, a thorough analysis ofthe subject is essential to assess the feasibility ofindustrial hemp production in the Pacific Northwest.

Hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) has been grown for many centuries for the strong fiber produced in its stems. Hemp seed also contains a useful vegetable oil, and the upper leaves and. industrial hemp in the United States, a thorough analysis of the subject is essential to assess the feasibility of industrial hemp production in the Pacific Northwest.

Hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) has been grown for many centuries for the strong fiber produced in its stems. Hemp seed also contains a useful vegetable oil, and the upper leaves and.

Feasibility of industrial hemp production in the United States Pacific Northwest by D. Ehrensing,Agricultural Experiment Station, Oregon State University edition, in EnglishPages: Published May Reviewed December Facts and recommendations in this publication may no longer be valid.

Please look for up-to-date information in the OSU Cited by: Feasibility of Industrial Hemp Production in the United States Pacific Northwest May For many centuries hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) has been cultivated as a source of strong stem fibers, seed oil, and psychoactive drugs in its leaves and flowers.

Details Feasibility of industrial hemp production in the United States Pacific Northwest PDF

Environmental concerns and recent shortages of wood fiber have renewed interest in hemp as a raw. study, Feasibility of Industrial Hemp Production in the United States Pacific Northwest, summarizes current information and research on hemp harvesting, retting, and fiber separation when the crop is grown for fiber (Ehrensing).

Harvesting When grown for textile fiber, the crop is harvested when the fiber is at its highest quality. During World. "The Feasibility of Industrial Hemp Production in the United States Pacific Northwest," publication SBis available by mail at no charge, single copies only.

Send your request to: Publication Orders, Extension and Station Communications, OSU, Kerr Administration, Corvallis, Ore. North American Industrial Hemp Council (CASA3) OR-Feasibility of Industrial Hemp Production in the Pacific Northwest (CASA3) Poisonous Plants of North Carolina: abstract & image (CASA3) USDA Farmers Bulletin No.

(CASA3) University of New Orleans: hemp line drawings (CASA3). "USDA ERS - Industrial Hemp in the United States: "Feasibility of Industrial Hemp Production in the United. States Pacific Northwest, SB". • By the s, the state of Kentucky produced about half of the industrial hemp in the U.S.

The first hemp crop there was planted in Boyle County in • Henry Ford, founder of the Ford Motor Company, created a plastic car in which ran on hemp and other plant-based fuels, and whose fenders were made of hemp and other materials.

As a result, production in the United States is restricted due to hemp’s association with marijuana, and the U.S. market is largely dependent on imports, both as finished hemp-containing products and as ingredients for use in further processing (mostly from Canada and China).

The fact that the commercial production of hemp has been legally prohibited in the United States has not deterred substantial interest in the feasibility of U.S.-grown industrial hemp. Both federal and state research institutions have conducted many production and market feasibility studies.

A number of these studies are listed and. States that allow cultivation of hemp • 33 States allow hemp production of some sort (mostly in the form of a pilot program) Industrial Hemp State Survey results presented at National Hemp Regulators Conference, Louisville, KY, J24 states responding.

Yes-Universities and/or Dept. of Ag has a pilot program, Ehrensing, Daryl T., Feasibility of Industrial Hemp Production in the United States Pacific Northwest [pdf link] Oregon State Univ. Expt. Station Bulletin Oregon State University, Corvallis. The results of investigation show that industrial hemp is promising plant for biomass production in Latvia.

Depending on the variety the green over-ground biomass varies from 36 - 54 t ha-1 in. Feasibility of Industrial Hemp Production in the United States Pacific Northwest. Corvallis, Oregon: Oregon State University Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin Here is same study in pdf.

Links. North American Industrial Hemp Council is the best beginning source on industrial hemp. (I am a founding board member and currently serve as.

hemp industry. Nine states explicitly legalized the production of industrial hemp by private farmers, while the others provided for various levels of research —from studies of the feasibility of commercial hemp production to actual agronomic research involving hemp production at the research facilities.

Everywhere this book travelled, it created hemp activists, or “Hempsters” as they were called.

Description Feasibility of industrial hemp production in the United States Pacific Northwest FB2

Feasibility of Industrial Hemp Production in the United States Pacific Northwest,Agricultural Experiment Station, Oregon State University and seed, versus the dry-stem yields reported by other researchers.” Industrial Hemp in the.

Publications Feasibility of Industrial Hemp Production in the United States Pacific Northwest. Oregon State University Extension Service. SB Daryl T. Ehrensing.

Comprehensive assessment as of Some Background on Industrian Hemp in a Western Oregon Context. Russ Karrow, et al.

Document prepared for November 9, forum organized by Congressman Earl Blumenauer. Industrial Hemp as a Modern Commodity Crop by Williams, D. Hemp as a Modern U.S. Commodity Crop provides an overview of industrial hemp as an agronomic crop in western cropping systems. Emphasis is given to the long history of hemp, mostly in the United States, and to current production issues pertinent in the US as well as Europe and Canada.

Hemp has been a controversial topic in recent decades in the US, but the crop itself has been in production for thousands of years. In fact, a piece of hemp fabric has been dated back to 8, United States has a long history of its own hemp production, which included the original colonies.

publications have recently touted the revival of industrial hemp in the United States, a thorough analysis of the subject is essential to assess the feasibility of industrial hemp production in the Pacific Northwest.

Hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) has been grown for many centuries for the strong fiber produced in its stems. Industrial Hemp Podcast. The Lancaster Farming Industrial Hemp Podcast keeps you up-to-date on the hemp industry in Pennsylvania and beyond.

This monthly newsletter is filled with recent episodes, upcoming interviews, bonus material from the show, photos and videos of hemp operations, plus industry news and helpful hemp resources.

made of hemp. Peak hemp production in the United States was in the mids with temporary spikes during both World Wars. Industrial hemp production was most common in Illinois, Iowa, Indiana, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Kentucky—which had the highest production.

The cultivation of hemp, primarily for fiber, was common. The Agriculture Improvement Act of The Agriculture Improvement Act of ( Farm Bill) authorized the production of hemp and removed hemp and hemp seeds from the Drug Enforcement Administration’s (DEA) schedule of Controlled Substances.

It also directed the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to issue regulations and guidance to implement a program to create a consistent. daryl t. ehrensing, feasibility of industrial hemp production in THE UNITED STATES PACIFIC NORTHWEST (), available atarchived at (from Feasibility of Industrial Hemp Production in the United States Pacific Northwest, OSU SBMayDaryl T.

Ehrensing) Hemp normally is dioecious having both male (staminate) and female (pistillate) plants, each with distinctive growth characteristics. Male. industrial hemp from the list of United States controlled substances, making regulated hemp production legal within the United States.

In order to make hemp oil and fiber processing viable, markets for the remaining meal must be found (Mustafa, A. But a study of the scientific literature, which the OSU Agricultural Experiment Station has published as a report titled The Feasibility of Industrial Hemp Production in the United States Pacific Northwest, found that several conditions must be met before hemp could ever become a crop in this region.

--Report to the Governor's Hemp and Related Fiber Crops Task Force --Commonwealth of Kentucky, June --Summary --Feasibility of Industrial Hemp Production in the United States Pacific Northwest --May --Executive Summary.

--Economic Impact of Industrial Hemp in Kentucky --July --Executive Summary. Feasibility of Industial Hemp Production in the United States Pacific Northwest () – in depth research paper with plenty of useful information and some informative images.

Hemp: A New Crop with New Uses for North America – looks like. Hemp: OR-Feasibility of Industrial Hemp Production in the Pacific Northwest: Oregon: Fiber: Herbs: Clemson U.

Home and Garden Fact Sheets: South Carolina: World Crops for the Northeast United States: Maine: Vegetable: Multiple crops (check link for list): World Crops for the Northeast United States.In a report, Feasibility of Industrial Hemp Production in the United States Pacific Northwest, by Daryl Ehrensing, Department of Crop and Soil Science, Oregon State University: For many centuries hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) has been cultivated as a source of strong stem fibers, seed oil, and psychoactive drugs in its leaves and flowers.